Watermelon Lime Ice Pops

Watermelon Popsicles

Pick up nearly any box of ice pops in the supermarket and you’ll find no shortage of sugar and plenty of artificial ingredients to boot. It’s kind of a bummer if you ask me, since a more wholesome pop is easy to come by.  Indeed, there’s no reason ice pops need be much more than fruit or juice, and enough added sweetener to make you want seconds. These Watermelon Lime Ice Pops are a perfect example.

Easy Homemade Watermelon Pops

The other thing about homemade ice pops is that they’re easy to make. For these watermelon pops, you whiz together whole, fresh melon, agave nectar, and fresh lime juice. Pour into pop molds and freeze. That’s it. The reason I like agave for these is that a liquid sweetener doesn’t need to be dissolved first, like sugar does. You could also swap in honey if you like.

Watermelon Lime Ice Pops

Healthy and Hydrating Ice Pops

These watermelon pops are full of vitamin C, vitamin A, and the antioxidant lycopene. Plus, with its high water content, watermelon is great for hydrating on hot summer days. As for sugar content, each pop has just a touch over a teaspoon of added sweetener per pop. That is much lower than most of what you’ll find in the freezer section of the market.

If you like these Watermelon Lime Ice Pops, you might like:

Watermelon Blender Juice

Is Watermelon Healthy?

Watermelon Salad with Feta and Almonds

Wild Blueberry Coconut Yogurt Pops

Watermelon Lime Ice Pops
5 from 1 vote
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Watermelon Lime Ice Pops

Tasty, refreshing, colorful watermelon pops, no artificial colors or flavors required. Each pop has less than a teaspoon of added sugar (in the form of agave) and make a perfect summertime snack or dessert.
Course Dessert, Snack
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 8 three-ounce pops
Calories 55 kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 cups chopped seedless watermelon
  • 3 tablespoons light agave nectar (less if your melon is super sweet)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

Instructions

  1. Put watermelon, agave, and lime into a blender and run until smooth. Pour into pop molds and freeze.

Watermelon Popsicles pinterest graphic

Comments

07.29.2011 at 7:24 AM #

Bliss

just bought a baby watermelon! It’s not seedless, but we’ll manage. Thank you.

07.29.2011 at 7:24 AM #

Katie Morford

Little fingers are perfect tools for unearthing seeds from a watermelon!

07.29.2011 at 9:55 AM #

Pam

Yum! I made strawberry/raspberry/cherry ice pops (with a bit of simple syrup) last week that have been a big hit here. It was a great use for fruit that softened a big faster than we were eating it.

08.01.2011 at 7:25 AM #

Jennifer

We tried the cherry-vanilla popsicle recipe from the Times Magazine a couple of weeks ago. Pitting the cherries was a great kid job and the popsicles were yummy. We’ll be trying watermelon pops this week!

08.01.2011 at 7:25 AM #

Katie Morford

Yes….all pitting, stemming and peeling jobs are perfect for the kids….and then less of a chore for mom!

08.16.2011 at 8:18 PM #

Meggin

Can I use the same technique for other fruits like strawberries and blueberries as they are my son’s favorite fruit?

08.16.2011 at 8:18 PM #

Katie Morford

Hi Meggin

I think popsicles would work with both types of berries. However, the watermelon recipe may not work. Watermelon is inherently very sweet and very watery. The other berries may require some sweetening and additional liquid. Here is a recipe I found from Alison Brickel, who is known for pretty reliable recipe. http://www.bakedbree.com/healthy-strawberry-popsicles#axzz1VINuoBF5 I think I’ll try them myself. As for blueberries, I suggest doing a little poking on the web and see what comes up. One thing I like to do is combine fruit and or juice with vanilla yogurt and freeze those to make creamy yogurt pops. Let me know how it goes.

08.22.2011 at 7:55 AM #

kim connector

Yum! We tried this and got was it a hit. I also tried strawberries but blended them with a bit of coconut water.

08.22.2011 at 7:55 AM #

Katie Morford

I love the idea of using coconut water. That, along with the watermelon makes a potassium powerhouse. Thanks for sharing.

07.05.2013 at 4:29 AM #

vakantiehuisje frankrijk

Hey There. I found your blog using msn. This is an extremely well written article.
I will make sure to bookmark it and return to read more of your useful info.

Thanks for the post. I’ll certainly comeback.

07.05.2013 at 4:29 AM #

Katie Morford

Welcome. Hope you like what you find here.

07.11.2016 at 9:13 AM #

Filomena

I’ve been freezing watermellon for a couple of years now – never thought of adding lime! I’ll try that tonight!

07.11.2016 at 9:13 AM #

Katie Morford

It adds a nice tangy counterpoint to the sweet watermelon. Also, fresh mint is another nice one with watermelon too.

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